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The Kalbelias of Rajasthan: Jogi Nath snake charmers. An ethnography of Indian non-pastoral nomads.

Robertson, Miriam (1997) The Kalbelias of Rajasthan: Jogi Nath snake charmers. An ethnography of Indian non-pastoral nomads. PhD thesis, London School of Economics and Political Science (United Kingdom).

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Abstract

The Kalbelias, known also as Jogi Naths, live in Rajasthan, North India. Their traditional occupation is snake charming and until about forty years ago they were nomadic. Nowadays nearly all have permanent homes but continue to utilise their tents for economic and social purposes. This thesis describes their present way of life, their adaptation from nomadism to semi-sedentarism, their traditional work as snake charmers and their economic strategies of begging and other subsidiary occupations. The Kalbelias' religious orientation as Naths and life events such as marriage, death, inheritance and their system of dispute settlement which serves as a cohesive force for the sub-caste, are described. Pastoral and non-pastoral nomads are found in most parts of the world, and are capable of Infinite adaptation according to the circumstances in which they find themselves. As snake charmers, the Kalbelias have a symbiotic relationship with the other peoples around them and also form a continuing link through time.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Uncontrolled Keywords: Anthropology, Cultural, South Asian Studies
Sets: Collections > ProQuest Etheses
URI: http://etheses.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/2473

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