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This island's mine: Anglo-Bermudian power-sharing and the politics of oligarchy, race and violence during late British decolonisation, 1963-1977

Greening, Benedict (2014) This island's mine: Anglo-Bermudian power-sharing and the politics of oligarchy, race and violence during late British decolonisation, 1963-1977. PhD thesis, The London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).

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Abstract

By 1991, Britain retained responsibility for 14 overseas dependent territories. A policy of accelerated decolonisation that took shape under British Governments between the early 1960s and the late 1970s had, by the early 1980s, given way to what Drower has called an ‘era of colonial permanence’.1 This was because territories such as Bermuda refused to take the hint and move towards independence. This thesis examines the way in which Britain appeared to lose control of the process of decolonisation. It will do this by studying power-sharing dynamics in Bermuda between 1963 and 1977. It is argued that Britain did not exercise full control in Bermuda in 1963; her role was characterised by London’s dependence upon Governors who accommodated themselves to the dominant white minority both for pragmatic reasons and out of shared cultural and racial affinities. It was this dynamic that suffused three forums of Anglo-Bermudian collaboration: constitutional reform in 1963-1968; the internal security state in 1968-1973; and the colonial justice system in 1973-1977. This period saw a rapid diminution of British power in Bermuda, a process accelerated by proliferating constitutional ambiguities and metropolitan decline. In contrast, the power of Bermudian conservatives was entrenched via electoral advantages and enhanced local autonomy.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Additional Information: © 2014 Benedict John-Paul William Greening
Library of Congress subject classification: J Political Science > JZ International relations
Sets: Departments > International History
URI: http://etheses.lse.ac.uk/id/eprint/960

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